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    September 30, 2014

    I have a new author to add to my favorite authors list. (Pause) actually, I don’t really have a favorite authors list so this one can be the first. I love Alice Duer Miller. She pretty much writes romantic comedies in the 1920s. Her works aren’t necessarily novels. She has stories that range from longer short stories to short novels. Maybe she writes novellas… If I knew what those were. I want to collect all her books, except her poetry because I want stories not poems, and add them to my small library.
    She writes plays too!! If you have the chance to read ADM, do it.

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    (Source: 500px.com, via rachellgmh)

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    fuckyeahvintage-retro:

New York City, 1932

    fuckyeahvintage-retro:

    New York City, 1932

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    September 13, 2014

    Has anyone noticed that Microsoft still uses the floppy disk icon to save a file? Does anyone still use a floppy? I would. Floppy is fun to say.

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    I told my sisters that I loved this film but could never own it on DVD. I have too many mixed emotions about this movie that I would only feel guilt claiming to own a copy.
First off, Billy Crudup is mighty good lookin!! MIGHTY! He’s got a double dimple thing going on which means his smile is irrisistable. He has freckles which I could appreciate any attractive male with freckles. (I have never turned down the idea that Richie Cunningham was down right attractive.) To quote She’s the Man, “He’s so handsome, and rugged, and chiseled, and great.”
With that aside, a little context helps. This film takes place in the English Restoration period, somewhere in the 1600s. Men still played female characters as women were forbidden to act in the theater. Crudup plays the last great female actor, Kynaston, competing with the first professional actress, Margaret Hughes. Hughes used to be his costume dresser; she always admired the actor both emotionally and career wise. As she rises in the ranks, he falls. This pains Hughes.
The majority of the film is watching Kynaston struggle with gender identity. His entire life was learning how to perform women and perform them well. When asked to act on stage as a man, he can’t do it. The delicate hand gestures and high pitched vocals creep into his performance. Kynaston no longer has a job seeing that hundreds of women are auditioning for the same roles he is. He just wants to act. But since he was never taught how to act as a man, acting the roles he must play does not come easy.
But he’s also struggling with sexual identity. Its revealed early in the film that Kynaston has a male lover. This makes sense; his performance as a women has bridged into his personal life. The attraction for men on stage becomes an attraction for men off stage.
When Kynaston meets with his male lover later in the film his companion shares the news that he will be married very soon. Kynaston is confused and heartbroken that his lover is leaving him for a woman. His lover admits that he never was passionate for Kynaston. When they made love, his lover would envision making love to the women Kynaston played. He was always drawn to the women.
Kynaston becomes an unemployed scrounger. Hughes comes to his aid. To make a long story short, they get very cozy in bed and begin to make love. This next part is what bothers me. There is some face and neck stroking but its all done very theatrically. In essence, Kynaston instructs Hughes how a woman on stage moves her hands and Hughes repeats. Even in love making with a woman, he is still trapped in his female identity. By the end of this scene, there is a strong indication to believe his passion is real. But is it really? My understanding of love is there is no room for confused gender roles in love making between a man and a woman. The sexually active female should ignite the sexually active male reminding him that he is male and must play the male role with a sexually active female. That’s whats so beautiful about sex: two complex puzzle pieces fitting together perfectly and being proud that they fit so well. But Kynaston is still confused. I’m not asking for a heated sex scene but this mentor and student session taking place instead of sex has me irritated that Kynaston still has not discovered his manhood when the perfect opportunity approaches.
The plot moves along. Hughes is asked to play Desdemona but she feels she is not right for the role. How true she is! She is not a terrific actress despite the fact she is the first. Her director brings Kynaston in to be her acting coach for one evening. The play goes off with a bang, there is a twist ending to the show, Hughes plays the best Desdemona and Kynaston plays the best Othello (without falling into any feminine habits)
It looks as if both actors have discovered how to be true to their genders on stage. That’s great! What about off stage? Well, while the after party is happening, Hughes asks Kynaston who he is. (This refers to a game which Hughes asks the question and Kynaston replies with either “I am the man” or “I am the woman.”) This was the moment I was waiting for. Kynaston has discovered how to be a man. His response will identify with his discovery. However, he says, “I don’t know.”
You should know that if I were Hughes, my response would be, “You don’t know!?!? Boy, what do you mean ‘you don’t know’? You be sure to know I’m not waiting for a boy to discover himself. I need a man who can be man enough for me right now! You better reexamine yourself and find another answer to that question!!”
That’s my response. Hughes’ response is a soft smile of devotion and then they start making out. WHAT! Did you not hear him? He just told you he is not completely man! Which means your relationship is not sturdy! I give up. I don’t understand.
That’s how the movie ends. But for me, the film’s message is incomplete. Only one of the two major plots has been concluded. It looks like both Kynaston and Hughes will have successful careers on the stage but what about off stage. Ending on the last line ‘I don’t know’ provides no clear answers to the struggles of Kynaston’s personal manhood. Is he truly devoted to Hughes the way a man should be? Will Hughes find satisfaction in him? I’m not sure and I don’t consider myself an incompetent film viewer. This film is not black and white by the end and this is why I hate the movie enough not to buy it.
Everything else is delightful: the story, the cast, the costumes…Billy… but the ending is too grey to be a true ending.

    I told my sisters that I loved this film but could never own it on DVD. I have too many mixed emotions about this movie that I would only feel guilt claiming to own a copy.

    First off, Billy Crudup is mighty good lookin!! MIGHTY! He’s got a double dimple thing going on which means his smile is irrisistable. He has freckles which I could appreciate any attractive male with freckles. (I have never turned down the idea that Richie Cunningham was down right attractive.) To quote She’s the Man, “He’s so handsome, and rugged, and chiseled, and great.”

    With that aside, a little context helps. This film takes place in the English Restoration period, somewhere in the 1600s. Men still played female characters as women were forbidden to act in the theater. Crudup plays the last great female actor, Kynaston, competing with the first professional actress, Margaret Hughes. Hughes used to be his costume dresser; she always admired the actor both emotionally and career wise. As she rises in the ranks, he falls. This pains Hughes.

    The majority of the film is watching Kynaston struggle with gender identity. His entire life was learning how to perform women and perform them well. When asked to act on stage as a man, he can’t do it. The delicate hand gestures and high pitched vocals creep into his performance. Kynaston no longer has a job seeing that hundreds of women are auditioning for the same roles he is. He just wants to act. But since he was never taught how to act as a man, acting the roles he must play does not come easy.

    But he’s also struggling with sexual identity. Its revealed early in the film that Kynaston has a male lover. This makes sense; his performance as a women has bridged into his personal life. The attraction for men on stage becomes an attraction for men off stage.

    When Kynaston meets with his male lover later in the film his companion shares the news that he will be married very soon. Kynaston is confused and heartbroken that his lover is leaving him for a woman. His lover admits that he never was passionate for Kynaston. When they made love, his lover would envision making love to the women Kynaston played. He was always drawn to the women.

    Kynaston becomes an unemployed scrounger. Hughes comes to his aid. To make a long story short, they get very cozy in bed and begin to make love. This next part is what bothers me. There is some face and neck stroking but its all done very theatrically. In essence, Kynaston instructs Hughes how a woman on stage moves her hands and Hughes repeats. Even in love making with a woman, he is still trapped in his female identity. By the end of this scene, there is a strong indication to believe his passion is real. But is it really? My understanding of love is there is no room for confused gender roles in love making between a man and a woman. The sexually active female should ignite the sexually active male reminding him that he is male and must play the male role with a sexually active female. That’s whats so beautiful about sex: two complex puzzle pieces fitting together perfectly and being proud that they fit so well. But Kynaston is still confused. I’m not asking for a heated sex scene but this mentor and student session taking place instead of sex has me irritated that Kynaston still has not discovered his manhood when the perfect opportunity approaches.

    The plot moves along. Hughes is asked to play Desdemona but she feels she is not right for the role. How true she is! She is not a terrific actress despite the fact she is the first. Her director brings Kynaston in to be her acting coach for one evening. The play goes off with a bang, there is a twist ending to the show, Hughes plays the best Desdemona and Kynaston plays the best Othello (without falling into any feminine habits)

    It looks as if both actors have discovered how to be true to their genders on stage. That’s great! What about off stage? Well, while the after party is happening, Hughes asks Kynaston who he is. (This refers to a game which Hughes asks the question and Kynaston replies with either “I am the man” or “I am the woman.”) This was the moment I was waiting for. Kynaston has discovered how to be a man. His response will identify with his discovery. However, he says, “I don’t know.”

    You should know that if I were Hughes, my response would be, “You don’t know!?!? Boy, what do you mean ‘you don’t know’? You be sure to know I’m not waiting for a boy to discover himself. I need a man who can be man enough for me right now! You better reexamine yourself and find another answer to that question!!”

    That’s my response. Hughes’ response is a soft smile of devotion and then they start making out. WHAT! Did you not hear him? He just told you he is not completely man! Which means your relationship is not sturdy! I give up. I don’t understand.

    That’s how the movie ends. But for me, the film’s message is incomplete. Only one of the two major plots has been concluded. It looks like both Kynaston and Hughes will have successful careers on the stage but what about off stage. Ending on the last line ‘I don’t know’ provides no clear answers to the struggles of Kynaston’s personal manhood. Is he truly devoted to Hughes the way a man should be? Will Hughes find satisfaction in him? I’m not sure and I don’t consider myself an incompetent film viewer. This film is not black and white by the end and this is why I hate the movie enough not to buy it.

    Everything else is delightful: the story, the cast, the costumes…Billy… but the ending is too grey to be a true ending.

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    No shame. I will forever love POP Tarts

    No shame. I will forever love POP Tarts

    (Source: addaspoonfullofsugar, via rachellgmh)

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    September 6, 2014

    Whoa! Its been awhile since I’ve been on my Tumblr. It feels like a month. It hasn’t been but it feels that way.

    I’m now in Rochester, NY, attending the Selznick School of Film Preservation. I, already, have too much reading and books that are accumulating but Im dedicated to this study so I’m sticking to it. I just learned about the exact degradation process of nitrate film. Shall I explain it? Only because you asked…

    Nitrate film emits a gas called Nitrogen Dioxide (NO 2).

    NO 2 + moisture from gelatin = nitrous acid & nitric acid

    Acids corrode silver salts in emulsion destroying the picture.

    Effects of degradation are: film shrinkage, film rigidity, pungent smells, emulsion becomes sticky, indescribable mass with crust which, over time, become just powder.

    FASCINATING, RIGHT!?!?!?!?!?!

    And lets keep in mind that if nitrate film gets to hot it is highly flammable and not easily extinguished.

    I’m having a blast in my new apartment and I’m already making friends with the girls in my program. Claire and Erin are 1st year Masters students and Kate is a 2nd year Masters student. I’m the only female Certificate Fellow.

    At the George Eastman House where I study, there is a small theater called the Dryden Theater. I’ve only been to 2 screening so far but, boy, have they been good. Last night, myself and the girls saw 9 To 5 which is always a very funny movie. The films themes of equality in the workforce made it the premiere of this seasons Rochester Labor Film Series. There was 4 speeches about NY’s Labor responsibilities and Unions and mushy stuff like that. Then the movie started and it got better.

    The night before I went to see the film Stage Beauty. This was a really good film but I’ll write more about it in another post.

    Now, I’m gonna heat up some leftovers for dinner and continue to read.

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    Move in day!!!

    Move in day!!!

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    A movie starring Click Five. Should I buy or not? Decisions are so hard.

    A movie starring Click Five. Should I buy or not? Decisions are so hard.

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    August 27, 2014

    I (with the help of my father) made an interesting observation this evening.  I was thinking back to the Great Depression, the first time in our nation’s history when entertainment was purposeful in boosting morale, specifically thinking back to the movies. Movies were huge motivators for looking on the bright side of life. Even the movie palaces were designed to help a poor homeless individual escape from the panic surrounding the nation. Movies like My Man Godfrey, Personal Property, Top Hat, and Perfect Strangers all focused on the story of a man or woman without a job finding the love and care of someone wealthier than they. These were the crowd pleasers. Every movie ended with a happy ending; a happy ending with a pocket full of money and new dreams.

    Well we just went through a new economic depression. Just after the time when Wall Street fell, America started producing a record of films with the same plot and themes. Back in the 30s, to cheer up America, movies transported the audience to a world of luxury and finery, of stability and fullness. Art Deco was the most extravagant accessory to any piece of architecture. These details will not work in 21st century America. But superheros! Now, superheros are everything that this country wants when we’re flat on our faces in the mud. Superheros can fly us to new heights with the world shrinking small beneath our feet. Superheros are humorous so that their paranormal qualities do not overwhelm the audience. Superheros are the saviors that sacrifice themselves so that this country continues to stand strong when, in reality, we’ve hit the lowest of lows.

    Glamor and glitz was the answer to depression in the 30s.

    Capes and tights is the answer for our depression now.

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    fuckyeahvintage-retro:

New York City, 1920
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    Academy Award Winners 1954

    1954 Best Picture: On the Waterfront

    1954 Best Director: Elia Kazan; On the Waterfront
    1954 Best Actress: Grace Kelly; The Country Girl
    1954 Best Actor: Marlon Brando; On the Waterfront
    1954 Best Supporting Actress: Eva Marie Saint; On the Waterfront
    1954 Best Supporting Actor: Edmond O’Brien; The Barefoot Contessa
    1954 Best Story: Broken Lace
    1954 Best Screenplay: The Country Girl
    1954 Best Story and Screenplay: On the Waterfront
    1954 Best Cinematography Black and White: On the Waterfront
    1954 Best Cinematography Color: Three Coins in the Fountain
    1954 Best Art Direction Black and White: On the Waterfront
    1954 Best Art Direction Color: 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea
    1954 Best Sound Recording: The Glenn Miller Story
    1954 Best Editing: On the Waterfront
    1954 Best Visual Effects: 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea
    1954 Best Costume Design Black and White: Sabrina
    1954 Best Costume Design Color: The Gate of Hell
    1954 Best Score Drama or Comedy: The High and the Mighty
    1954 Best Score Musical: Seven Brides for Seven Brothers
    1954 Best Song: "Three Coins in the Fountain"; Three Coins in the Fountain
    1954 Best Animated Short: When Magoo Flew
    1954 Best Live-Action Short One Reel: This Mechanical Age
    1954 Best Live-Action Short Two Reel: A Time Out of War
    1954 Best Documentary Short: Thursday’s Children
    1954 Best Documentary: The Vanishing Prairie
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    lapitiedangereuse:

“He was too old for me, he’d had three wives, he drank, he was an actor and he was goyim,” Bacall wrote in her autobiography of her prime passion.  All that meant nothing to the slinky 19-year-old model who met the 44-year-old star while filming To Have and Have Not.  They wed in 1945 (Bogie coolly muttered “hello, baby" at the end of the ceremony), and the two embarked on several delirious years running late with the Hollywood Rat Pack, saving time for two children.  "Bogie and I were ridiculous, holding hands like teenagers….we mooned and swooned, we really loved,” Bacall has said.  The honeymoon ended in January 1957 when Bogart died of cancer.  Wrote Bacall: “No one has written a romance better than we lived it.” 

    lapitiedangereuse:

    He was too old for me, he’d had three wives, he drank, he was an actor and he was goyim,” Bacall wrote in her autobiography of her prime passion.  All that meant nothing to the slinky 19-year-old model who met the 44-year-old star while filming To Have and Have Not.  They wed in 1945 (Bogie coolly muttered “hello, baby" at the end of the ceremony), and the two embarked on several delirious years running late with the Hollywood Rat Pack, saving time for two children.  "Bogie and I were ridiculous, holding hands like teenagers….we mooned and swooned, we really loved,” Bacall has said.  The honeymoon ended in January 1957 when Bogart died of cancer.  Wrote Bacall: “No one has written a romance better than we lived it.” 

    (via fuckyeahvintage-retro)

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My name is Jennifer and I decided to join tumblr for the fun of it. With my having no life you can imagine how fun it is to scroll through the many pages of blogs for hours upon hours. I'll gladly share my thoughts and opinions. Mind you- they will all be clean and appropriate. I choose not to waste my time with crude thoughts and distasteful actions. Let's get started!

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